COUNTER CURRENT

Understood in scientific arenas, the concept ‘countercurrent’ refers to an exchange common in nature but mimicked as a mechanism in industry and engineering, describing the oppositional flow of two different properties, creating a crossover. Concurrently, to work within a counter current is to embrace and integrate difference and flexibility. As such, Counter Current is informed by an understanding of adjustment, amalgamation, collaboration and disruption of routine towards the creation of new possibilities and the inclusion of a broader plurality, because a current is never singular. To pluralise is to include, extending the conversation to allow for difference, additions, variety and diversions. Counter Current, thus extends, includes, adds and encompasses a turn toward new possibilities of exhibition making, art practice and forms of expression. As we settle into the newness of Spring, bringing with it a new exhibition at Eclectica Contemporary, Counter Current offers a break with convention within our gallery – away from the traditions of the white cube that privileges certain voices, aesthetics and modes of working. Considering an understanding of ‘current’ additionally as referring to notions of time and the present, this exhibition asks us to question and understand the multitude of counter currents that flow across our times, of change, disruption, ease and release.

We think of Counter Current as a presentation of inclusion and additions – challenging and querying the conventions that exist in exhibition making, while presenting work by artists who confront and counter the traditions of art practice.  This exhibition showcases new medias and modes of creating, highlighting technology and dimensional work – through videos, installations, sculptural pieces and digital imaging.

In Anda Mncayi and Sterling Trimby’s illustrative pieces, alternative realms, counter narratives and worlds are built. Through the inventive depictions they have each created, possibilities are reimagined and visualised. Ibrahim Khatab’s elaborate calligraphic works are richly layered, contemplating traditions and the interactions of graphic systems. On densely patterned boards, his works play with focus, perspective and comprehension. Carla Janse van Rensburg’s imagery engages a discussion on power, superstitions and self-healing. Through an investigation in ritual and repetition, the work integrates technological possibilities with process and chance.

Kyu Sang Lee and Martin Wilson propose a meditation on the concept of time and its relationship to consciousness through their work together. Working together across mediums their installation demonstrates an investigation of space, dimensionality and corporeality. Through their installation, they show the medium of light and sound as a catalyst, calling the viewers into a space of quiet contemplation. Echoing conceptions of contrasts – life, light, darkness, loss – is Victoria Scott’s light installation. Her construction of light-forms juxtaposes and makes present the relationships occurring in liminal spaces, of uncertainty, possibility and potential. Where light plays with colour, shadow engages form – this is demonstrated in the painting installations of Christian F. Kintz. The blocks of colour in his work propose a rethinking of how light and colour interact, while extending paint into dimensional and textural objects.

Oscar Keogh’s video work confronts hegemonic convention through humour and the uncanny, disrupting and upending expectations and presumptions. Through performance and the interplay of props and costume, the work instigates a conversation around reality and the constructions present in day-to-day existences. Anthony Lane’s sculptural pieces invoke recognisable objects but are distorted and experimented with. The forms play with energy, movement and illusion through their physical presence, created through intuitive and labour intensive processes.

Through an inclusion of new modes of working, this exhibition proposes options for engaging differently, flowing with new considerations and allowing for the incompleteness of processes that remain ongoing. Counter Current invites new and familiar artists into the gallery while interrogating and challenging our own habits and conventions. Through plurality, we invite broader engagement and lateral interactions. The works extend off and away from gallery walls, resisting the confines of genre, medium or material expectations. They expand and augment, activating different spaces, subjects and formats by creating new visual conversations. What exists within this exhibition has been gathered by acknowledging an open-ended thought, with the hope of encompassing and encouraging wider integration and interaction.

Christian F. Kintz

Christian F. Kintz was born in 1968 in Freiburg, Germany. He completed is Masters at Freie Akademie für Bildende Kunst in Freiburg (1993), as well as Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Hamburg, Germany (1998). His artistic work is part of various public collections, including but not limited to the Museum Haus Konstruktiv, Zurich; and the Museum für Gegenstandsfreie Kunst, Otterndorf, Konst pa Andersen, Stockholm.

Kintz‘ artistic approach is painterly, non-figurative and free of any symbolic intention. Influenced by Abstract Expressionism, Christian’s work stands in the tradition of Concrete Art as well as Colour Field Painting. In his artworks, formalist concerns meet sensual painting gesture. Therefore at first glance what seems contradictory, mingles into a perfect balance. Colour is conceived in a poetic sense: it is self-evident and therefore bears an essential truth.

Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm

Christian F. Kintz
2019
reverse glass paintings
16 cm in diameter

The series of circular reverse glass paintings have their roots in a series of painted wooden objects made of old German table time pieces. Formerly covering the dials, the circular, concave glasses turned into new art works. Traditional reverse glass painting in Germany runs back to medieval times. In Christian’s work this tradition is paired with non-objective painting in strong colours and is therefore transformed into something entirely different.

Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm (4of9)
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm
Christian F Kintz, 2019, acrylic on corrugated iron, 40 x 35 cm

Christian F. Kintz
2019
acrylic on corrugated iron
40 x 35 cm
(each)

Christian F Kintz, 2016, oil on canvas, 40 x 35 cm(1of5)
Christian F Kintz, 2016, oil on canvas, 40 x 35 cm(1of5)
Christian F Kintz, 2016, oil on canvas, 40 x 35 cm(3of5)
Christian F Kintz, 2016, oil on canvas, 40 x 35 cm(4of5)
Christian F Kintz, 2016, oil on canvas, 40 x 35 cm(1of5)

Christian F. Kintz
2016
oil on canvas
40 x 35 cm
(each)

Anthony Lane

Born in 1961 in Springs, South Africa
Lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa

Anthony Lane is a full time sculptor and multi award-winning designer, who skilfully marries the technical sophistication of a master draughtsman with an instinctive understanding of three dimensional forms and mass. His sculptural projects deal primarily with contemporary abstract representations of the human form while also investigating the themes of order and chaos. Colour theory, music, humanitarian and social issues and the influence of social media on society are also explored in his practices. A lover of architecture his works have strong structural and mathematical aesthetic. Working on multiple projects simultaneously allows for cross-pollination of themes creating a dialogue between his works despite their diverse subjects.

Through the labour intensive process of hand forming individual stainless steel plates, and then meticulously constructing his unique, fragmented sculptures, the artist transforms a somewhat cold and impersonal medium into energetic, cascading shapes, full of life and expression. Carefully considered and placed, the shaped stainless steel mimics the intricate curves of the human body, exposing visual clues, which simultaneously reveal and conceal when viewed from different angles. These bold, expressive representations with their reflective surfaces provide the viewer an entry point to Lane’s seemingly meditative projection, which seeks to encapsulate the transference of light between the interior and exterior. The illusion of shapes and forms created by the reflections in the steel simultaneously project and recede, becoming a metaphor for the human condition.

“What interests me is pursuing work that has integrity, originality and transcends time and fashion”

Anthony Lane, 2018, Mixed Media sculpture ( ADHE 3 ), 30 x 30 x 86 cm

Anthony Lane
ADHE 3
2018
Mixed Media sculpture
30 x 30 x 86 cm

Anthony Lane, ADHE 7, 2018, mixed media sculpture, 49 x 30 x 102 cm

Anthony Lane
ADHE 7
2018
Mixed Media sculpture
49 x 30 x 102 cm

Anthony Lane, 2018, Mixed Media sculpture ( ADHE 8 ), 49 x 30 x 91cm

Anthony Lane
ADHE 8
2018
Mixed Media sculpture
49 x 30 x 91 cm

Anthony Lane, ADHE 4, 2018, mixed media sculpture

Anthony Lane
ADHE 4
2018
Mixed Media sculpture
30 x 30 x 74 cm

Anthony Lane, ADHE 7, 2018, mixed media sculpture, 49 x 30 x 102 cm

Anthony Lane
ADHE 5
2018
Mixed Media sculpture
30 x 30 x 74 cm

Anthony Lane, ADHE ?, 2018, mixed media sculpture

Anthony Lane
ADHE
2018
Mixed Media sculpture
30 x 30 x 74 cm

Ibrahim Khatab

Ibrahim Khatab, a Cairo born artist, currently lectures at the National University of Cairo and has exhibited both locally and internationally. His art showcases his knowledge and technical skills of paintings, installations and video art. Ibrahim’s artworks visually expresses the artist’s deep love of calligraphy, as well as colour, space, movement and arabic script which all factor heavily in his practice.

Ibrahim Khatab feels that Islamic Calligraphy played a poignant role in the education of art and writing. Then and now, the medium is seen to be an important element of the Arabic cultural legacy, an eternal heritage that Khatab fell in love with when he was 10 year’s old. Years of honing the technical skill allowed him to use this talent as a source of income (by designing banners for commercial spaces and beautifying the pilgrims’ houses who had arrived from Mecca)and it has become central to his designs as a practicing artist today.

Ibrahim Khatab Untitled 2019 Mixed media on Board 120 x 120 cm

Ibrahim Khatab
Untitled
2019
Mixed media on Board
120 x 120 cm

Ibrahim Khatab Untitled 2019 Mixed media on Board 120 x 120 cm

Ibrahim Khatab
Untitled
2019
Mixed media on Board
120 x 120 cm

Anda Mncayi

“I’m a 25 year old artist based in Cape Town. I’ve loved drawing for as long as I can remember. Growing up my friends and I would sit for hours on end, drawing our favourite comic book super heroes and characters from anime. After matriculating in 2012, I came to Cape Town to study Graphic Design at Cape Peninsula University of Technology, and completed my ND in Graphic Design in 2016.

Having been based in Cape Town for the past 5 years, I’ve had great opportunities to work on exciting projects and have collaborated with other fellow artists and creative’s that inspire me. In 2016, I was a finalist for Nestle’s Art Project – an art competition that was part of Nestle South Africa’s centenary commemoration. In 2017, I had the amazing opportunity to be part a graduate programme at Woolworths and I worked as a junior designer for 6 months after.

In 2019, I won the national round of the Absolut Creative Competition, representing South Africa among 18 other countries around the word for the global stage.

In between all the professional work over the years, I’ve had the cool experience of being part of a number of group exhibitions in the city. I specialize mostly in illustration; and I look forward to working on more exciting projects in this field.”

Anda Mncayi, Astral Realm - Space, 2018. A2 Inkjet, True Fibre

Anda Mncayi
Astral Realm – Space
2018
Inkjet, True Fibre
A2 (1/10)

Anda Mncayi, Astral Realm - Time, 2018. A2 Inkjet, True Fibre

Anda Mncayi
Astral Realm – Time
2018
Inkjet, True Fibre
A2 (1/10)

Anda Mncayi, Astral Realm - Energy, 2018. A2 Inkjet, True Fibre

Anda Mncayi
Astral Realm – Energy
2018
Inkjet, True Fibre
A2 (1/10)

Astral Plane

There’s a misconception, that when new technology is developed, we leave our traditions behind. This series explores the timelessness of our ancestors and the guidance they can provide for the future. Astral Plane looks at our connection to the environment. The material environment and the astral realm. The process of creating each piece involves sketching out on paper then inking them traditionally, lastly, adding colour using digital software such as Illustrator and Photoshop.

Anda Mncayi, Dreaming-Awake, 2017. A2 Inkjet, True Fibre

Anda Mncayi
Dreaming-Awake
2017
Inkjet, True Fibre
A2 (1/10)

Anda Mncayi, Dreaming-Awake - Quintessence, 2017. A2 Inkjet, True Fibre

Anda Mncayi
Dreaming-Awake: Quintessence
2017
Inkjet, True Fibre
A2 (1/10)

Anda Mncayi, Dreaming-Awake - Awake, 2017. A2 Inkjet, True Fibre

Anda Mncayi
Dreaming-Awake: Awake
2017
Inkjet, True Fibre
A2 (1/10)

Dreaming Awake

Dreaming awake explores the experience in which one is in a state between wakefulness and sleep. Sleep acts as a portal to a higher dimensional realm, the imagination. Dimensions in this sense are layers of reality, which are based on a range of vibrational frequencies. These dimensions are places of creation and they are where our ancestors reside. Ideas and manifestations are instantaneous in these worlds and there exists no sense of separation. Wakefulness on the other hand acts as a renewal of energy in the conscious mind. The transition from sleep to wakefulness is akin to the cycle of life and death.

In this series I have considered the connections to our waking reality and the realities that go beyond the physical realm commonly referred to as the spirit world(s). These higher dimensions are where we can set sail on the shore of the imagination and explore the inner regions of our lives and nature. It is the rebirth of the forgotten language of the winds and rain, a language of energy.

Sterling Trimby

Sterling Trimby is a multi-disciplinary artist from Cape Town, South Africa. With a creative background and an obsession for illustration, he spent his youth drawing and painting. Through underwater photography, the door to the digital frontier was opened, providing a new platform of expressive freedom. Further obtaining a degree in graphic design and along with the quest for spirituality, fantasy, and adventure, the definition of his art began to take shape.

Portraying esoteric concepts and symbolism combined with science fiction, he takes viewers on a journey challenging prescribed systems and provoking the understanding of reality. Let your mind play!

After conceptualizing, Sterling’s work process all starts by hand. Sketching with pencil and technical pens, most of the elements begin organically and are then transformed digitally. Once inside design software, the process can vary, but mixing pixels and vector and adding a lot of colour and atmosphere is typically standard. Sometimes a piece is completely autonomous and randomly created freely and sometimes the art can be fully conceptualized and then executed in a planned manner from start to finish.

Sterling Trimby Divinity 2019 Metal Print, edition 25 84.1 x 118.9 cm

Sterling Trimby
Divinity
2019
Metal Print, edition 25
84.1 x 118.9 cm

If we could only realize just how integrated and connected we are to it, then this planet would be thriving indeed. See the beauty in nature, see the beauty in yourself. It’s time to elevate our consciousness and let it grow strongly again with our world, our divine home.

Sterling Trimby Sacred Codex 2019 Metal Print, edition 25 84.1 x 118.9 cm

Sterling Trimby
Sacred Codex
2019
Metal Print, edition 25
84.1 x 118.9 cm

The Vitruvian Man bears great connotation as a symbol of the Renaissance and in turn, is acknowledged with the embrace of our digital revolution. A tribute to art, science, spirituality and beyond, expressing humankind’s interlinking and expanding consciousness, all formatted elegantly into the sacred geometrical code.

Sterling Trimby Alignment 2019 Canvas Print, edition 25 84.1 x 118.9 cm

Sterling Trimby
Alignment
2019
Canvas Print, edition 25
84.1 x 118.9 cm

Ancient records transcribe various principals and understandings of the nature of the universe and our place within it. Through meditation, it is possible to grasp, appreciate and connect with these phenomena, feeling the power and love of the universe and experiencing it’s beauty and wisdom.

Sterling Trimby Sorcery 2019 Perspex Print, edition 25 150 x 100 cm

Sterling Trimby
Sorcery
2019
Perspex Print, edition 25
150 x 100 cm

Astral projection opens the door to many new worlds through the dream frontier. Mixed with metaphor and electricity, alchemy is embedded in the subliminal texture. The secrets of the universe can be unlocked through the realization of sacred geometry and are shown as a glimpse in this expression of magic.

SCUM BOY

SCUM BOY – two words which aptly describe the fast emerging trans artist, translating his queer 3D rendered art into a 2D-heteronormative world. His work, which closely reflects this curt, to-the-point, artistic persona, contains a sort of pristine vulgarity. There is an ingrained repulsiveness within SCUM BOY’S body of work, whether it be because of patriarchal ingrained prejudices, or simply the tender comfortability which he destroys with his surrealistic, suggestive figures and landscapes.

SCUM BOY Don’t Blow Smoke On My Sweet Peas 2019 Mixed media installation Dimensions vary

SCUM BOY
Don’t Blow Smoke On My Sweet Peas
2019
Mixed media installation
Dimensions vary

“Don’t Blow Smoke On My Sweet Peas” tackles the relevant question of gender based violence in South Africa. The video piece is accompanied by an interactive element which will allow viewers to express themselves regarding personal experiences. His exhibition will tackle the latest battle he fought against gender based violence in Cape Town, taking his online presence into the real world.

Oscar Keogh

Oscar Keogh is a queer, non-binary, Cape Town based artist, writer videographer and performer. Their practice is one of questioning, it centers around alternative forms of storytelling, intended to critique and defy conventional linear structures. Like a magpie, they collect disparate images, videos and objects that somehow work together in weaving together their particular worldview. Their work tries to speak in particulars with a confident uncertainty about the world, though being inanimate objects, they lack the vocal chords.

Oscar Keogh Walking home white girl wasted with two trunkless legs of stone. 2018 mixed media installation 43 x 55 cm

Oscar Keogh
Walking home white girl wasted with two trunkless legs of stone.
2018
mixed media installation
43 x 55 cm

There are strange things done in the midnight sun, and the northern lights have seen queer sights. But the weary traveler is bound to wander – retracing their steps beginning again and again, relapsing in cycles of doubt. It is written in their code. They are not quite at home on the range but their house is on fire, their children all roam. They’ll have to feed the cats otherwise they’ll be yowling again at 5AM.

Oscar Keogh Joy of Sex

Oscar Keogh
Joy of Sex: Let’s talk about sex baby, let’s talk about you and me.
2018
mixed media installation
43 x 33 cm

It had been a frigid and withholding winter. All the desirables had been locked up, seen but never heard, looked at but never touched. As the snow began to thaw and cuffing season came to an end, it was time to inhabit the earth once again with impassioned delicacy. One might even go so far as to coo to a dove, very softly and under the breath. Or perhaps even light a candle and let the wax drip all over the tablecloth. The possibilities for carnal yet frugal delights were simply endless.

Oscar Keogh The Exquisite Corpse 2018 mixed media installation 43 x 33 cm

Oscar Keogh
The Exquisite Corpse (you may not like it but this is what peak performance looks like)
2018
mixed media installation
43 x 33 cm

His belly was rumbling and his tongue was tied before the rest of him knew what he wanted. Maybe it was something he ate? Standing bushy browed and erect in his trembling boots he wondered if his top was a bit see-through and maybe someone would see his boobs. He couldn’t quite measure up to his idea of himself, not now, not with these parts. Was anyone looking through him? He hoped not, he felt ill-equipped to deal with the whole situation.

Oscar Keogh Show some restraint when rifling through the lost and found box 2018 mixed media installation 43 x 33 cm

Oscar Keogh
Show some restraint when rifling through the lost and found box
2018
mixed media installation
43 x 33 cm

A dog went missing on the eve of its 13th birthday. She couldn’t quite handle the pressure of a birthday – the pressure of a forced panting smile. The candles, the cake, the cavities. This was lost on a dog who most of all wanted to know why no one payed any mind to the trapped moths thrashing themselves against the windows at nighttime. The dog ate every moth in the house before digging her way under the white picket fence to freedom. She does not wish to be found.

Carla Janse van Rensburg

Carla Janse van Rensburg is a multi-disciplinary artist working from Cape Town, South Africa. They graduated from Michaelis School of Fine Art in 2019. They explore themes of transcendence, the divine feminine, ritual, magic and divination in an attempt to initiate healing. They are interested in reflections; the internal state reflects the external state, the macrocosm and microcosm, and vice versa.

In 2015, Carla participated in “Return to Sender Exhibition”, a Group Show organized by the CCA at the African Studies Gallery. In 2016, Carla participated in a First Thursday at 91 Loop, participating as an artist and as an assistant to the curator, Giselle Le Roux(A Fundraiser Auction Exhibition for the organization Food For Life). In 2017 they participated in various group shows and artistic events, including but not limited to “Fragments of Imagination”, “Exploring the Body”, “The Communion”, “Mothers, Money, Manuscripts and Minutes” & “Kiss The Light, Embrace the Darkness”

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Air Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

(10 minute exposure of Air Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Ancestry Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Ancestry Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Consecration Ritual 1) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Consecration Ritual 1)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Consecration Ritual 2) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Consecration Ritual 2)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Earth Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Earth Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Earth Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Earth Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Fire Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Fire Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Fire Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Fire Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Forgiveness Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Forgiveness Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Forgivness Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Forgivness Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Pain Transference Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Pain Transference Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Pain Transference Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Pain Transference Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Protection Vase Consecration Ritual 1) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Protection Vase Consecration Ritual 1)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Protection Vase Consecration Ritual 2) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Protection Vase Consecration Ritual 2)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Protection Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Protection Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Recoding Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Recoding Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Recoding Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Recoding Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Transformation Vase Consecration Ritual ) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Transformation Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Transformation Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

 (10 minute exposure of Transformation Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Unlearning Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

(10 minute exposure of Unlearning Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Unlearning Vase Ritual) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

(10 minute exposure of Unlearning Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Water Vase Consecration Ritual 1) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

(10 minute exposure of Water Vase Consecration Ritual 1)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (10 minute exposure of Water Vase Consecration Ritual 2) 2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1of20 35.5 x 24.2 cm

(10 minute exposure of Water Vase Consecration Ritual 2)

Carla Janse van Rensburg
Untitled
2018 digital photograph archival ink on Hahnemuhle, 1/20
35.5 x 24.2 cm

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Air Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Air Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Ancestry Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Ancestry Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Collective Pain Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Earth Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Earth Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Earth Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Earth Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Fire Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Fire Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Fire Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Fire Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Forgiveness Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Forgiveness Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Pain Transference Vase Consecration Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm copy

(12 minute exposure of Pain Transference Vase Consecration Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Protection Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Protection Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Recoding Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Recoding Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Transformation Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Transformation Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Unlearning Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Unlearning Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (12 minute exposure of Water Vase Ritual) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 38.5 x 38.6 cm

(12 minute exposure of Water Vase Ritual)

Carla Janse van Rensburg
Untitled
2018
Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1/3
38.5 x 38.6 cm

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Air - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Air – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Ancestry Vase - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Ancestry Vase – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Collective Pain Vase - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Collective Pain Vase – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Earth Vase - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Earth Vase – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Fire - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Fire – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Forgiveness - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Forgiveness – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Pain Transference - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Pain Transference – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Protection Vase - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Protection Vase – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Recoding - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Recoding – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg Untitled (Unlearning - Above View) 2018 Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1of3 29 x 29 cm

(Unlearning – Above View)

Carla Janse van Rensburg
Untitled
2018
Handprinted Film Photograph on Archival Fibre Paper, 1/3
29 x 29 cm

Womb Healing Spell

Womb Healing Spell (2018) is a performance of sacred ritual, as recorded through long-exposure photographs. My performance work combines elements of intersectional feminism, queer theory, Alchemy and ritual magic in order to manifest self-healing and empowerment. It is through healing the physical body that one can heal the body’s metaphors; the womb is also creation energy. It is through the healing of mothers that we can affect the world, for it is representative of the creative force that connects us all. It is through the channel of the womb that we are made manifest in connection to our ancestry, and it is through our ancestry that we are connected to the collective.

Victoria Scott

Victoria Isabelle Mason Scott is a installation artist whose preferred medium is light. She has created structures using steel, rope and glass, to sculpt light in various ways and build immersive environments. These environments aim to interact with their viewers and provoke introspective thoughts about their physical presence and life, and in contrast, their mortality. 

Victoria began creating light installations in her third year at Michaelis; here she explored the mediums symbolic nature and used it to navigate the concept of death and how death affects life. 

The artist is out of the country for the remainder of this year. Yet she intends to return to Johannesburg where she will continue her explorations of light in her art practice

Victoria Scott Falsified Death 4of5 2018 mixed media installation approx. radius 50cm

Victoria Scott
Falsified Death 4/5
2018
mixed media installation
approx. radius 50cm

Victoria Scott Falsified Death 5of5 2018 mixed media installation approx. 120 cm

Victoria Scott
Falsified Death 5/5
2018
mixed media installation
approx. radius 50cm

Victoria Scott Falsified Death 2of5 2018 mixed media installation approx. 120 x 40 x 70 cm

Victoria Scott
Falsified Death 2/5
2018
mixed media installation
approx. radius 50cm

Victoria Scott Falsified Death 1of5 2018 mixed media installation approx. 100 x 50 x 70 cm

Victoria Scott
Falsified Death 2/5
2018
mixed media installation
approx. radius 50cm

Illuminating Morality

Illuminating Mortality is an installation that intends to be a space for introspection. The installation uses visual elements to embody metaphorically the tensions of knowing our finitude, by using mirror, rope, water, and light as the chosen materials to express the concept through symbolic significance. Light becomes a pivotal medium in creating an immersive environment, which in turn creates an atmospheric space. Heidegger and Jasper’s theories of two possible ways of viewing death, with fear or acceptance provide a departure point for Illuminating Mortality. The atmospheric nature of my body of work invites reflection and meditation on death with the aim to use the contemplation as a tool in life. Through visually executing what it means to think about death, I have mapped self-reflection on a concept I personally find fearful through the three installations, Mapping Absence, Falsified Death and Realised Death. In this way I have attempted to grapple with the inevitability of death.

Kyu Sang Lee

Kyu Sang Lee’s photographic artistic practice draws on his experience within distinct regions and cultures of the world. Born in Seoul, Korea in 1993 and having moved to Cape Town in 2005, his artistic practice exhibits strong influences of Eastern, Western and African cultures. While completing his degree in Fine Art at Michaelsi School of Fine Art (University of Cape Town) he was awarded the Cecil Skotnes Award for Most Promising Artist.  Kyu Sang Lee was also awarded the Simon Gerson Prize in 2016 for his graduating body of work as well as the Celeste Prize for Photography & Digital Graphics in 2017.

Kyu Sang Lee’s knowledge of Music, Art, History and world issues is exstensive and strongly influences his artmaking process. Working in predominantly black and white photography and more recently mixed media installation, He presents an interesting juxtaposition to ideas of the “lost”, driven by the concept of time and fate. Interlocking these notions with photography and sound, he focuses on constructing the realm of the metaphysical, the spiritual and the surreal.

Kyu Sang Lee, The Trembling Soul Where the Time Flows Quietly Over the Waves Giclee print on Hahnemule Baryta - 1of5 + 2AP 42 x 50 cm .psd

Kyu Sang Lee
The Trembling Soul Where the Time Flows Quietly Over the Waves
Giclee print on Hahnemule Baryta – 1/5 + 2AP
42 x 50 cm

Kyu Sang Lee Goldberg 2 of 5 2017 glicée print 84.1 x 118.9 cm (unframed) png

Kyu Sang Lee
Goldberg 2/5
2017
glicée print
84.1 x 118.9 cm (unframed)

Kyu Sang Lee, Dancing Along Alone 2017 Archival light jet 59.4 x 42 cm

Kyu Sang Lee
Dancing Along Alone
2017
Archival light jet
59.4 x 42 cm

Kyu Sang Lee The Festival of Insignificance (diptych) 2016 Inkjet natural archival print 221.5 x 139 cm 2
Kyu Sang Lee The Festival of Insignificance (diptych) 2016 Inkjet natural archival print 221.5 x 139 cm 2

Kyu Sang Lee
The Festival of Insignificance (diptych)
2016
Inkjet natural archival print
221.5 x 139 cm

Martin Wilson

Martin Wilson is a Cape Town based artist, engineer and part-time lecturer at the Michaelis School of Fine Art. Although originally born in Westville, Durban, he moved to Cape Town to study at the University of Cape Town – obtaining both a Masters degree in Electronic Engineering (2011), and a Bachelor in Fine Art (2015, with distinction). Martin’s interest in visual perception began during his research in the field of machine vision, but he soon became frustrated with the arbitrary academic divide between the arts and the sciences.

In an effort to bridge this gap he decided to turn down a promising career in engineering in order to enroll in art school. Unsurprisingly, Martin’s artistic practice is still deeply entangled with scientific enquiry – simultaneously adopting and critiquing its methods and values. In particular, his work seeks to question the legitimacy of any true objective knowledge in our chaotic, fluctuating and unpredictable world, and to emphasize the inherent limits of human perception and comprehension.

Kyu Sang Lee & Martin Wilson The Sound of Light 2019 Mixed media installation 88.5 x 64.5 x 13 cm(each)

Kyu Sang Lee & Martin Wilson
The Sound of Light
2019
Mixed media installation
88.5 x 64.5 x 13 cm(each)
(Photographer: Martin Wilson)

 

Kyu Sang Lee and Martin Wilson

The Sound of Light

The Sound of Light – Sequences I – III (2019) is a triptych which generate anatomical body of music passing through a prism of light and to capture the combination of arrangement and rhythm of light expressed by energy in a light-sculptural organism. The work contemplates on time-consciousness and creates a relationship between time and man, using a medium of light and sound as a catalyst. Sound is a typical method for one to understand passing of time which has direct link to the question of the end of one’s time as time and death are inseparable. On the contrary, an element of light is used in this work as symbolism of life. There is an ironic interplay between death and life as the system in the artwork constantly translates sound into light energy.

Kirsten Arendse

Since 2015, Michaelis alumni Kirsten Arendse has been fascinated by the concept of “non-beauty” and the ways in which western beauty standards have dictated women. Much of her artistic practice has involved the use of hair and its connotations to societal beauty, as it is one of many physical aspects of the body that many feel like they have to try and control, condition and maintain.As a young coloured woman, Arendse has struggled with the idea of control, constantly trying to manipulate her hair to what she had been taught to be “beautiful”, until finally allowing her hair to be as it was intended to be. In some aspects of her culture, curly hair is deemed or has been deemed as undesirable. She explains that if you had curly hair in this way you were therefore labelled a “kroeskop” or a “bossiekop”. These are two of many terms that have negatively governed the appearance of non-European individuals for many years in efforts to other, segregate and demean.

For this exhibition, Arendse has taken this same concept and grappled with it in relation to methods of conditioning and control in efforts to try and challenge or allude to the hidden systems many communities of colour are still dictated by. She etching on perspex, to speak to ideas of manipulation and synthetic culture.

Kirsten Arendse Holding on to What’s Left. 2019 Mixed media installation 55 x 42 x 10 cm

Kirsten Arendse
Holding on to What’s Left
2019
Mixed media installation
55 x 42 x 10 cm

Kirsten Arendse For the Gram 2019 Mixed media installation 19.1 x 40.45 cm

Kirsten Arendse
For the Gram
2019
Mixed media installation
19.1 x 40.45 cm